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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
, as the number of briefs that outline for a higher education, business officials, civil rights groups, that outlined support for the use of race at the university of texas, briefs that are in opposition. but broader public opinion, it appears only about a quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is broad support among the same set of voters for preference in college admissions based on income. given these results, it is not surprising that ward connerly, who will be on the panel, has been extremely successful in his efforts to ban affirmative action based on race in a number of states. so far, the efforts are 546. -- five for six. five out of six times, voters, when given the option, have said we should and the option of racial affirmative action at colleges and public employment, including blue states like california, michigan, and washington. the second major problem facing affirmative-action, of course, is the legal issue, which will be joined in the fishe
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
it's civil rights or women's rights for workers rights what people remember what unions were created in the first place. most of the world today has no recollection of why that happen. they don't know that god work 18 hours, you got paid a number that couldn't even let you live in a town in which you work. people don't understand what the database came from to the have to be an evolution and innovation within that movement. icy unions today, the smarter ones, doing all kinds of interesting things. to incorporate a fair work where they take their own money and great economic development. a lot of what i saw during the recession where banks warned lenin were taking their own pension conservation, their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that's smart. that's look at how to get economic development activity, get my folks work. by do something to incentivize the economy. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are innovating and thinking differently about it. i think to underestimate the the kind of political promise unions have today in am
that ron paul has history. what of his histories is the civil rights act of 1964. it valued the property rights of businesses. [inaudible] let's get to the issue of mitt romney. i'm not crazy about everything the president has done but being a businessman does not necessarily qualify you to run a country simply because the demands of a corporation are not the same as those of the nation. guest: one of the things that research has shown is that young people don't score differently on political knowledge questions. the people who are older than them, above 30, -- they may lack some experience but a great deal of young people who have other issues, people are concerned about jobs in the economy. when they have doubled the of employment rate, those people have a great deal of patience on issues in their voices should be heard in their communities and nationally because of that experience and because of our democracy. host: we're heading into the final weeks of the campaign. in the postgraduate realm, 57% are supporting barack obama. some colleges are evenly divided. jonesboro, arkansas, good
important. the most important civil right is voting. it's with everything else relies on, and the disenfranchisement isn't a casual thing even if it doesn't turn and the election if somebody can't vote in a state that is solid blue or solid red that is also because that person hasn't been able to participate with it changes the outcome, but i think that with the nfl rapid which did get that strike or lockout rather did get settled very quickly after every book on the national television saw the game that went the wrong way, and tragically at me make something like that for the voter i.d. and suppression to get not only the media attention but the judicial attention that it deserves. >> i want you to join in here. so, it from the data perspective the voter suppression is extremely small. i have no idea what the right percentage should be but it is under 1% and another one of the topics that is just way down that we believe should be more a part of the coverage is the money in politics, so the fund raising is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
's civil rights, workers rights, or women's rights where people remember why unioners created. most of the world has no rex why it happened. you had to work 18 hours and never got overtime. you got paid a number you live in a town which you work. people don't understand where the value base came from. there is going to be an evolution or innovation in the movement. i see union doing all kinds of interesting thing. don't corporate affairs work they follow pension resources and they take their own money and create economic development. that's smart. looking how do i get economic activity get my folks. ensure my rate of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
of unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a whole history of whether it is civil rights or women's rights or workers' rights and people remember why it was needed to be created in the first place. they do not know they had to work 18 hours and overtime. you got paid a number and you cannot even live in the town where you worked. there is good have to be some kind of evolution and innovation in that movement. there are all kinds of interesting things in the corporate affairs works for the follow resources and create economic development. during the recession, banks were not lending. there were taking their own investment managers and seeking opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at, how can i get economic activity? how can i get a return? i think there is a lot of compelling union out there that are thinking differently about it. to underestimate the kind of political clout that unions have in america, it would not be smart. >> i would say one thing to watch as we go forward, politically, especially from new jersey and east, the unions have different powers
to think about unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a history, whether civil or women's rights are workers' rights, were people remember why unions were created in the first place most of the world today has the recollection of what happened. you got paid in number that could not let you live in the town in which you lived. the walk to be an evolution in innovation. -- there will have to be an evolution in innovation. with a take their own money create economic development. -- where they take their own money and create economic development. their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at how to get folks work and do something to incentivize the economy to move again. there are a lot of intelligent unions thinking differently about it. there are a pretty powerful group. >> wanting to watch, especially in new jersey and the north east, we cut -- we come from more unionized states. one of the things that is important -- is a growing season between public sector and the trades and private sector.
based on civil rights, based on human rights. and he was street treating it as a civil war and against each other and the government war being one of the infraction and that really frustrated syrians. let's end this question now. some of our colleagues would like to chime in with a couple more words. if you promise to be brief. >> i'll be brief. >> i just want to see when you talk about issues of negotiation and peace plans, you have to assume that the other party is civilized. when you have the other party using bombs to hit civilian areas, when you have snipers taking out children in bread lines, this is not a regem you can neglect a peace. this is a regime that has to go. >> i will simply direct you to an interview that the defected prime minister had two days ago in which he said that this was a first time made public that he had gone with the most senator leaders, the regional command to ask for a cease fire and for there to be a political dialogue. they said no way we will negotiate dialogue with the external opposition, know it is the security solution and a security solution al
, we have the worst civil rights violation in mississippi and the correction in the local and state government in mississippi. lives are being hurt. children are being kidnapped. i was very motivated to your mitt romney talk about the first amendment. >> we will get a couple more calls. back to our twitter stream. -- her ee is one this one says -- ours go to a caller on democrat line. go ahead. caller: i am a registered democrat. i am on a fixed income. i worry about our medicare and social security. people are on fixed incomes and depend on social security and medicare. i will vote for mitt romney. i feel that he is the one to straighten out this country and the mess that it is in. i voted for a bomb at of years ago and i am very disappointed in him -- obama four years ago and i am very disappointed in him. >> what made you decide to vote for mitt romney? >> i think he is the only one who could really get us out of this position that we are in. it can go on like this. i am against obama for what he did and taking 4 $5 billion out of our medicare system and putting it into obamacare
administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in overton who seem toe think the best thing about george bush is he not ronald reagan. >>> largely as a result of the policies and priorities of the reagan administration more people are becoming poor and staying poor in this country than anytime since world war ii. ♪ . >> if there is thinking left to ronald reagan's trickle down theory, done, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickng down through just about every segment of our society. ♪ . >> if you gave clarence thomas a little flower on his face you would think you had david duke talking. here is a man who, is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. ♪ . >> i hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and dies like many black men do of heart disease. that is how i feel. he is absolutely reprehensible person. ♪ . >> you've called gingrich and his ilk, your words, trickle down terrorists who base their agenda on exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class a
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)